The Sous Vide Trail

New York Strip and Pearl Onions with Port Wine Sauce

Steak - rubbed with Salt, Pepper, Paprika, Rosemary and Thyme. 

Sous Vide for 1:15 @ 134f - came out Rare/Medium Rare as steak was almost 2” thick.

Pearl Onions - sautee in port wine and a touch of balsamic vinegar with salt and freshly ground pepper.  Reduce for 1 hour.

Juicey!!!

Simple Cod with paprika, sauteed shallots and asparagus and light butter sauce.
Cod cooked for 25 minutes at 136f. 
Asparagus was blanched and sauteed with butter, garlic and shallots and a little bit of walnut oil and plated. 
Fish was removed from sous vide and lightly seared in same pan with shallots and butter and jus from the sous vide bag.
As I am not a pro, my presentation is a bit lame, however the taste was terrific.  You just have to love sous vide fish.

Simple Cod with paprika, sauteed shallots and asparagus and light butter sauce.

Cod cooked for 25 minutes at 136f. 

Asparagus was blanched and sauteed with butter, garlic and shallots and a little bit of walnut oil and plated. 

Fish was removed from sous vide and lightly seared in same pan with shallots and butter and jus from the sous vide bag.

As I am not a pro, my presentation is a bit lame, however the taste was terrific.  You just have to love sous vide fish.

Just a simple rib-eye.  Sous vide @134f for 1.5 hours, then quick sear.  Picture could have been better but steak was good. :)

Just a simple rib-eye.  Sous vide @134f for 1.5 hours, then quick sear.  Picture could have been better but steak was good. :)

thechubbyfoodist:


lobster and corn chowder

Got a pair of beautiful Maine Lobsters from my Mom (thank you!) and we decided to make a couple of dishes out of them. First was a lobster and corn chowder. We took both the lobsters and par boiled them for 4.5 minutes in a boiling pot. We shelled them and placed them in a bag for Sous Vide. Normally we do not care about herbs in the vac bag but lobster is so delicate we steeped tarragon in the butter, strained it and let it harden in the fridge. The lobster was finished in a 15 minute poach in 139 degree water. The base of the chowder is shallot, garlic, lobster broth, mushroom broth, half and half. We added the corn and lobster in the final few minutes and served with toast. SO RICH. Delicious.We (Julie) them embarked on lobster ravioli. Sous vide of lobster mixed with a little ricotta for filling inside of fresh made pasta. Served with lobster broth made from carmelized onion, lobster shells, and lobster mushrooms. Simmered down and clarified to a dark brown super rich stock. AWESOME! Fun night.

thechubbyfoodist:

lobster and corn chowder

Got a pair of beautiful Maine Lobsters from my Mom (thank you!) and we decided to make a couple of dishes out of them.
First was a lobster and corn chowder. We took both the lobsters and par boiled them for 4.5 minutes in a boiling pot. We shelled them and placed them in a bag for Sous Vide. Normally we do not care about herbs in the vac bag but lobster is so delicate we steeped tarragon in the butter, strained it and let it harden in the fridge. The lobster was finished in a 15 minute poach in 139 degree water.
The base of the chowder is shallot, garlic, lobster broth, mushroom broth, half and half. We added the corn and lobster in the final few minutes and served with toast. SO RICH. Delicious.
We (Julie) them embarked on lobster ravioli.
Sous vide of lobster mixed with a little ricotta for filling inside of fresh made pasta. Served with lobster broth made from carmelized onion, lobster shells, and lobster mushrooms. Simmered down and clarified to a dark brown super rich stock. AWESOME!
Fun night.

fyeahnomnoms:

pork belly lunch by souladdikt on Flickr.

pork belly lunch

polenta, pickled carrots, cucumber, sweet pepper, marjorum. Pork belly was cured in sugar, salt, sweet paprika, chipotle and sous vide at 180F for 8 hours then pan-seared. My interpretation of a recipe from the Alinea cookbook.

fyeahnomnoms:

pork belly lunch by souladdikt on Flickr.

pork belly lunch

polenta, pickled carrots, cucumber, sweet pepper, marjorum. Pork belly was cured in sugar, salt, sweet paprika, chipotle and sous vide at 180F for 8 hours then pan-seared. My interpretation of a recipe from the Alinea cookbook.

(Source: fyomnomnom)

jpeats:




Slow cooked lamb shank with gremolata and butternut squash gratin. These lamb shanks were the first in what I’m sure will be a long line of tests to find the best way to cook them sous vide. Last week’s 72-hour short ribs made it clear that very low temperatures and very long cook times could do wonders for these tougher, more flavorful cuts. The problem is, most of the recipes online tell you to cook lamb shanks at 180 for some number of hours. At that temperature, what’s the point? I want to use sous vide to make sure these babies come out medium rare and tender, not just super tender. But, lamb shanks also have all kinds of connective tissue that only just begins to break down at 140 degrees.
So, that’s where I started with my first test—a 140 degree water bath for 48 hours, with nothing other than salt and pepper. A quick sear at the end leaves the shanks looking like you see in the picture above. The results are delicious, but not quite right yet. On the plus side, the flavor is incredible. Braised shanks will never have such a deep lamb flavor or be cooked to a perfect medium rare like these are. But, at this temperature and duration, too much of the connective tissue remained in tact. It was fine and didn’t detract too much from the experience, but I would never serve them to guests that way. The plans for future testing include extending the time to 72 hours, raising the temperature a degree or two, and adding fat to the bag to essentially turn the process into confit.

jpeats:

Slow cooked lamb shank with gremolata and butternut squash gratin. These lamb shanks were the first in what I’m sure will be a long line of tests to find the best way to cook them sous vide. Last week’s 72-hour short ribs made it clear that very low temperatures and very long cook times could do wonders for these tougher, more flavorful cuts. The problem is, most of the recipes online tell you to cook lamb shanks at 180 for some number of hours. At that temperature, what’s the point? I want to use sous vide to make sure these babies come out medium rare and tender, not just super tender. But, lamb shanks also have all kinds of connective tissue that only just begins to break down at 140 degrees.

So, that’s where I started with my first test—a 140 degree water bath for 48 hours, with nothing other than salt and pepper. A quick sear at the end leaves the shanks looking like you see in the picture above. The results are delicious, but not quite right yet. On the plus side, the flavor is incredible. Braised shanks will never have such a deep lamb flavor or be cooked to a perfect medium rare like these are. But, at this temperature and duration, too much of the connective tissue remained in tact. It was fine and didn’t detract too much from the experience, but I would never serve them to guests that way. The plans for future testing include extending the time to 72 hours, raising the temperature a degree or two, and adding fat to the bag to essentially turn the process into confit.

klago:

Sous Vide cooked hotdogs, toasted bun, ketchup caviar, pickled onions, relish gel, and crumbled mustard?? HOLY! Lemme at it!

klago:

Sous Vide cooked hotdogs, toasted bun, ketchup caviar, pickled onions, relish gel, and crumbled mustard?? HOLY! Lemme at it!

(Source: thekingandi)